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V-J Day

September 2

!     Kiss   !!2

 

On August 15, 1945, news of the surrender was announced to the world. This sparked spontaneous celebrations over the final ending of World War II. On September 2, 1945, a formal surrender ceremony was held in Tokyo Bay aboard the USS Missouri. At the time, President Truman declared September 2 to be VJ Day.

 

Date When Celebrated  :

  • August 14th – Japan surrenders
  • August 15th – Surrender announced to the world
  • September 2 – Ceremony and formal signing of surrender
  • VJ Day marks the end of WWII, and the cessation of fighting against Japan. It is called “Victory In Japan Day or “Victory Over Japan Day”.

 

The confusion over three dates:

There is some confusion over what date is V-J Day. You can consider any (or all) of three dates as V-J Day. President Harry S. Truman caused some of this confusion……..

  • On August 14, 1945, the Japanese government cabled to the U.S. their surrender. This is the date of most modern observances.
  • On August 15, 1945, news of the surrender was announced to the world. This sparked spontaneous celebrations over the final ending of World War II.
  • On September 2, 1945, a formal surrender ceremony was held in Tokyo Bay aboard the USS Missouri. At the time, President Truman declared September 2 to be VJ Day.

Regardless of which day you view as VJ Day, World War II was finally over.  We like both dates so take your pick!

 

V-J Day in Times Square (also V-Day, and The Kiss is a photograph by Alfred Eisenstaedt that portrays an American sailor kissing a woman in a white dress on Victory over Japan Day (V-J Day) in Times Square in New York City, on August 14, 1945. The photograph was published a week later in Life magazine among many photographs of celebrations around the United States that were presented in a twelve-page section titled Victory Celebrations. A two-page spread faces three other kissing poses among celebrators in Washington, D.C., Kansas City, and Miami opposite Eisenstaedt’s, which was given a full-page display. Kissing was a favorite pose encouraged by media photographers of service personnel during the war, but Eisenstaedt was photographing a spontaneous event that occurred in Times Square as the announcement of the end of the war on Japan was made by U.S. President Harry S. Truman at seven o’clock. Similar jubilation spread quickly with the news.

Because Eisenstaedt was photographing rapidly changing events during the celebrations he did not have an opportunity to get the names and details. The photograph does not clearly show the face of either person involved and several people have claimed to be the subjects. The photograph was shot just south of 45th Street looking north from a location where Broadway and Seventh Avenue converge. Soon afterward, throngs of people crowded into the square and it became a sea of people.

The photograph was taken at 5:51 p.m. ET, according to Donald W. Olson and his team.

 

Follow the link to really nice V-J Day video.

Details

Date:
September 2
Website:
http://vimeo.com/5645171

Venue

V J Day
United States

Organizer

Al Pomeroy